In attempt to avoid making excuses again, I shall offer an explanation and insight into my personal make-up.

I like to make squares, but somehow putting things together daunts me. BUT only when it’s something new. For example, I don’t bat an eyelash at joining squares anymore. If a procedure is new to me though, it can take me days (or longer) to sit myself down and make myself learn the new thing.

Today’s new thing is raffia. I told you I’d never previously owned any, which includes never having worked with it. And, OK, it wasn’t just the raffia–specifically it was attaching the raffia to the scarecrow.

I don’t like glue.

Finally I settled on sewing the raffia to the squares. That decision made, it was THE SIMPLEST THING to sit down at the sewing machine and stitch the stuff in place.

Make that, THE WRONG place. Yeah.

Jeans legs post-amending. I wanted the yarn tails at the top of the squares where I think I'll need them for sewing. I sewed the first one on the yarn tail edge. You probably won't want to do that.

Jeans legs post-amending. I wanted the yarn tails at the top of the squares where I think I’ll need them for sewing. I machine stitched the first one on the yarn tail edge. You probably won’t want to do that.

However, my seam ripper and I are good friends. (They ought to give those gadgets a less violent name, don’t you think? Mistake fixer–too generic. Stitch solver–meh. The Seamstress’ Best Friend–that’s just ridiculous. Seam ripper works and EVERYONE knows what you mean when you say it.)

Picking stitches out of woven yarn squares falls into the less-fun section of the creativity continuum. But it didn’t take long.

Now my raffia is all attached to my squares.

Raffia-ed sleeves.

Raffia-ed sleeves.

NEW LEARNING EXPERIENCE ALERT!!!

Now I had to learn how to assemble the pieces.

I’m making myself out to be some kind of novelty-phobe, but that’s not the case. By way of explanation (not excuse)–I have two dogs and am presently their sole caretaker. I’m also a person living on a limited energy budget, so I like to veg out while I’m working. I really do love to learn new things. It’s just that learning requires a somewhat uninterrupted time chunk to devote to the process. (Fun as it is to learn from mistakes, it’s my opinion that not making them is even more fun.) Stopping a puppy from ripping up Daddy’s map of South Carolina is what I’d call an interruption–wouldn’t you?

Turns out it was easy to learn to sew the sleeve–make that ARM, because sewing the sleeve creates the arm: a two-fer job!

The two-in-one sleevearm!

The two-in-one sleeve/arm.

At this point I’m going to publish this post, but I’ll add to it as I create a set of jeans/legs, a shirt/torso, and soon (hopeful thinking), an assembled straw man!

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UPDATES–SHIRT ALERT

Our little straw friend is coming along nicely. It may not have been necessary to tack the folded sections in place, but because of the houndstooth pattern, it seemed like a good idea–to keep the seam more straight-looking when I sew the two pieces together.

These were the only buttons I had of suitable size (in the middle of the night last night). I might have preferred dark blue and brown, but on the other hand, I like the spots of color.

These were the only buttons I had of suitable size (in the middle of the night last night). I might have preferred dark blue and brown, but on the other hand, I like the spots of color.

JEANS, NOT GENES (nor a PAIR OF CHROMOSOMES)

Spent most of today discovering and rectifying a colossal mistake in regard to my scarecrow’s jeans. DON’T make them in two separate pieces like this:

DON'T make the jeans like this. If you like mistakes or unpicking stitches, though, knock yourself out.

DON’T make the jeans like this. If you like mistakes or unpicking stitches, though, knock yourself out.

Let me caution you to read the directions carefully and look at all the photos. Maybe I got to make this mistake so you won’t have to! Sew the front inseam first, then the rest will be easy.

Stitching Tip: When joining the squares, take the needle from the top of the fabric and through, rather than from underneath and through. Taking the needle through from the top makes a smoother seam. There will be a slight upraise on the reverse side of the seam. It’s a small difference, but it’s good practice to get smooth front seams when joining.

Jeans properly under construction.

Jeans properly under construction.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

 

That’s it for now. Makes me wonder how far along I’d be if I didn’t have to unmake the jeans . . .

One Thought on “Adventures in Pin Loom Weaving—Scarecrow Weave-Along (Part 3)

  1. I’m on pins and needles to see the whole thing!

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