I’m taking an art course—sort of on Facebook and sort of through email. That is, the lessons arrive in my email box, but there’s a community page on FB where we’re supposed to share what we’re learning.

The course is called Get Creative and Heal Your Heart (I think you can find it through that link). What I really like about it is that it promotes thinking as well as visual creativity. I’ve been working my way through the first lesson on the FB group and the lessons I receive via email. Read More →

A long time ago (in this galaxy) while I was taking a Shakespeare class in college, a friend gave me a birthday card with a picture of Garfield—dressed in Elizabethan-type garb and holding a drumstick—on the cover. It said, “To party or not to party?” Inside it said, “That is a stupid question.”

Last night my please-drown-me-in-sleep Kindle game, Thread Words, sent me an unsubtle message.

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One thing I’ve learned about design is that uniformity can sometimes be boring. You might say perfection is boring. (Is it even possible to be perfect in artwork? in anything?)

When I’m designing a pin loom square pattern I often have to struggle with interest vs. uniformity. Clarity usually carries the day. Sometimes uniformity is your friend. Usually a motif looks best if it’s centered in the square. Many designs look best if mirrored on both halves of the square.

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The other day I was trying to write a blog post about . . . well, let’s call it art. It was also about the compulsion to create and what to say about other people’s work. The more I wrote, the more . . . I wrote, and it was getting out of hand. There was too much to think about, to say, to express. Maybe I need to write it on paper, not type it. Certainly I want to keep pondering it.

Anyway, here are some recent art journal entries that have tried to expand on those ideas either verbally or visually. (CanĀ verbal refer to the written word as well as the spoken?)

This was my response to the attempted blog post. Luckily I’d already drawn the picture and left lots of room for writing. Otherwise there might not have been a picture.

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