I spent 3.5 hours video-recording something that–after an exorbitant number of hours editing–ended up being 14.5 minutes long.

But it’s pretty thrilling. You will catch your breath more than once. Maybe.

Here it is <drum roll>

How to Make (Not Build) Your Own 4″ x 4″ Pin Loom

I'm including this template image here in case anyone wants a closer look at it. Remember to poke through the circles but not the diamonds.

I’m including the template image here in case anyone wants a closer look at it. Remember to poke through the circles but not the diamonds.

 

A double row of leno followed by several rows of plain weave, then a single row of leno.

A double row of leno followed by several rows of plain weave, then a single row of leno.

I thought it would be interesting to try cropping a photo in a diamond shape. When photographing my bias leno squares, the openings didn’t show if the squares were laid flat, so I held this one up to the light. I confess I don’t really know what leno means (other than that it’s the former Tonight Show host’s last name), but I understand it’s a type of lace.

Oh, why not? Let’s look it up. So, leno is a type of weave wherein warp threads are twisted to give an open look. Read More →

What a darling baby gift! I’m so pleased today to feature the work of guest artist, Bee Sroe from the Facebook Pin Loom Weaving Support Group.

Someone's going to squeal with delight when they open this delightful surprise.

Someone’s going to squeal with delight when they open this delightful surprise.

I can recognize adorable work when I see it, but I’m not so good at coming up with it.

What really caught my eye about this project–along with the pleasant blend of colors–was the clever use of the 2″ x 2″ Weave-It squares. (Bee did say she used the Weave-It brand loom.) Another thing I really, really love is the use of the scalloped edge border–one of the most attractive features of Weave-It squares. So many of our pin loom projects seek to conceal that pretty border, but this project highlights it.

Bee said she only had three squares of the soft, silky light pink yarn and had to come up with a way to work with them. This I also appreciate. Using yarn scraps is what attracts many people to the little pin looms. Creative designing, combining of colors, and coordinating fabrics–that’s what fiber art is all about. Bee is a lady who knows her stuff.

Front view of pillow.

Front view of pillow.

Edge and back view of the pillow.

Edge and back view of the pillow.

Here are Bee’s instructions for how to assemble the pillow (rather than use a pillow form or fiber fill stuffing, she used regular density foam): “The way I did mine was to measure the 6 squares once they were all sewn together and cut the 1″ foam to match that, made it two layers and then squashed the edges together and hand sewed all around to make the pillow form. Then I cut material for the bottom and top that was at least a half inch larger than the 6 squares all the way around. Used the sewing machine sew up three sides of the fabric, put the pillow form inside, hand sewed the remaining side of the fabric and finally hand sewed the 6 loom squares onto the pillow. I tried sewing the loom squares onto the top piece of fabric first but my machine couldn’t handle it so I opted to hand sew the 6 squares, that’s how I was able to get the scalloped edges to show.”

I’m very anxious to make one of these myself, but so far I have so many ideas I can’t settle on any of them! Shall I make it with rug loom squares? Shall I make it with my tiny, condensed-space pin looms? Shall I make it with bulky yarn or maybe bouclé? So many choices . . .

Soon we’ll see what Sue comes up with!

 

Shall I tell you what strikes you when you look at this photo? (Saves us the trouble of playing the “What am I thinking?” game.)

Endless ends

Endless ends

All the yarn tails.

It would strike you too, if you were me (the one weaving them all in before I can sew the individual pieces together). There are ways to break up the monotony, of course, but it’s still monotony no matter how you sugar-coat it. Read More →