Because I don’t knit on circular needles, I sort of developed my own pattern.

I generally use acrylic baby yarn (weight category 3) which makes a nice, stretchy ribbing and leg part. I think I knit a little bit loose. If you want to use heavier yarn, just advance all the needle/hook sizes up by one size.

Use size 5 needles. Cast on 40 sts. (I use the long-tail cast on method.)

R1-16: K1, P1 ribbing

Switch to size 6 needles.

R17-80: stockinette st.

Switch to size 5 needles

R81-96: K1, P1 ribbing

Use size E hook for crochet bind-off.

Use size F hook to close seam, taking special care to close the very first stitch so it doesn’t leave a gap. I use a basic slip stitch, worked loosely. Work in ends.

Tip: I use Clover brand Wonder Clips to hold the edges in place so everything stays matched up along the sewing seam. (Tried another cheaper brand and returned them.)

 

Are you the kind of person who likes surprises? I don’t know if I am or not.

I also can’t decide if I’m the kind of person who likes to spoil surprises or not. Maybe I’m a thin ice kind of a gal. Let me explain.

I’m about to post photos of a gift I made for a mother-to-be. The gift is wrapped and ready to take over to her parents’ house, so she hasn’t seen it yet and doesn’t even know I made it. What are the chances she’ll stumble across this blog post before she receives and opens the gift? There’s my thin ice. It’s actually pretty thick . . . or I am.

What do you make for a baby boy whose parents are Dr. Who fans? A bear and a blanket featuring the Dr. Who Police Call Box. (I think the call box is how Dr. Who travels through time. All I know about Dr. Who I learned from Studio C sketches.)

The card says, “Being alive right now is all that counts”–Eleventh Doctor.

I hope the quote is appropriate. It seemed quirky and funny to me–the kind of thing I’d appreciate if I was a Dr. Who fan and someone who wasn’t was giving me a gift they hoped I’d enjoy.

 

Dr. Who baby blanket--front view.

Dr. Who baby blanket–front view

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Dr. Who baby blanket–half folded view

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Dr. Who teddy bear–front view

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Dr. Who teddy bear–back view. (Kerry thought he should have a call box centered on his back.)

When was it? December 2013, I think. My friend, Heather Bullough, told me about a local crocheting service project I could get involved with. I LOVE to crochet simple items; it’s something I can do with my hands while I watch DVDs or listen to audiobooks (which are other things I LOVE to do).

This is a link to the project. I’ve participated for two years now and my donations have been received with so much enthusiasm I’m a convert for life.

http://www.hebbsters.blogspot.com/2013/05/leg-warmers.html

This is a link to the pattern I used.

http://earning-my-cape.blogspot.com/2012/02/crochet-leg-warmers-child-sized.html

Here are photos of my two donations.

June 2014--I donated 21 pairs of leg warmers.

June 2014–I donated 21 pairs of leg warmers.

June 2015--25 pairs this year. (I got so involved making teddy bears for Little Lambs Foundation that I slacked off on crocheting.)

June 2015–25 pairs this year. (I got so involved making teddy bears for Little Lambs Foundation that I slacked off on crocheting.)

“Teddy bears?” you ask. Let me show you.

A few friendly faces for Northern Utah's foster kids.

A few friendly faces for Northern Utah’s foster kids.

Here’s the link for this adorable bear pattern:

http://www.shinyhappyworld.com/2014/04/warren-charity-bear-free-teddy-bear-pattern.html

Placing the pockets on the dress is a pain, so you might as well do it accurately. This is the method I’ve worked out to make it as easy and accurate as possible.

The sample shown is an Extra Large size dress with pockets measuring 6″ square (finished size).

Finished Dress (complete with pockets)!

Finished Dress (complete with pockets)!

Step One: Fold the finished dress in half to locate the center front. The center front of the dress is located at the top right of the photo (turquoise flower) on the inside of the dress. (What you’re seeing is the back left half of the dress.)

Find the front center of the dress by folding it in half lengthwise.

Find the front center of the dress by folding it in half lengthwise.

After locating the center front, lay the dress out flat on your work surface. Make sure to keep the two halves of the dress on either side of the back seam as even as possible.

Lay dress out flat, front side up.

Lay dress out flat, front side up.

Step Two: I frequently forget this step, but it’s very important! Insert a smallish cutting mat, or other non-pin-prickable material, between the front and back layers of the dress. The two photos here show the mat slipping between the two dress layers, and where the mat should be located after you’ve slipped it in place (only yours should be underneath the top layer of the dress).

Slip mat between top and bottom layers of the dress.

Slip mat between top and bottom layers of the dress.

Mat should end up in the middle of the dress, but between the two layers.

Mat should end up in the middle of the dress, but between the two layers.

Step Three: Use ruler(s) to make sure you have the body of the dress located equally to the right and the left of the back seam; on this particular dress there are 13″ to the left and 13″ to the right.

Rulers show the dress has equal amounts both to left and right of back seam.

Rulers show the dress has equal amounts both to left and right of back seam.

Second photo shows a close-up of the back seam with ruler to right and left of it (front edge of dress is folded up for clarity in the photo).

Close-up of seam

Close-up of seam

Step Four: Measure 15.5″ up from the bottom (for an Extra Large dress). Make sure to preserve the 13″ to left and right of dress center.

Center front of dress is located at top right corner of vertical ruler. Horizontal rulers show 13" to left and 13" to right of center front. (Top thin ruler acts as a straightedge to make sure lower three rulers are in alignment.)

Center front of dress is located at top right corner of vertical ruler. Horizontal rulers show 13″ to left and 13″ to right of center front. (Top thin ruler acts as a straightedge to make sure lower three rulers are in alignment.)

Step Five: Place pockets with help of T-shaped ruler configuration. Pockets pictured are 3.5″ from left and right edges, 7″ apart.

Use rulers to place pockets equidistant from left-edge-and-center and right-edge-and-center.

Use rulers to place pockets equidistant from left-edge-and-center and right-edge-and-center.

Step Six: I hope you didn’t neglect Step Two because now it pays off. Pinning the pockets in place is SO much easier when you’re not catching the back layer of the dress. After pinning the pockets in place, hold the dress up against yourself and check to see if pocket placement suits you. Sew pockets in place. (It takes me about 15 leisurely minutes to sew on four pockets. I discovered this because the first movement of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D finished at the same time I clipped the last thread. My friend suggested the tutorial was not complete without this information.)

Pin the pockets in place and sew. Make sure you leave the top open--don't sew it shut!

Pin the pockets in place and sew. Make sure you leave the top open–don’t sew it shut!

Do something good today. 🙂

Dress A Girl Around the World

Dress A Girl Around the World