Me test-driving a Lendrum Original--the wheel I decided to buy.

Me test-driving a Lendrum Original–the wheel I decided to buy.

1) INSTINCT–Ultimately I bought the wheel I wanted. Don’t ignore your leanings. If you favor one brand, or one type, over another, pay attention.

2) EXPERIENCE–I listened to people who said, “Try as many as you can,” but I only tried two different wheels. (I liked both the wheels I tried.) However, I saw several in action at a retreat I attended, and talked to their owners–beginners through experienced spinners. (Note: EVERYONE was happy with the wheel they purchased and I saw almost all the wheels I was considering.) One gal tried three wheels at the retreat and saw no significant difference between them. I was reluctant to ask people to let me use their wheels–I would hesitate to let someone else use mine, for one thing, but also, they had work in progress on their wheels and after class we all wanted to pack up and go back to our hotel rooms. So . . .

Tim Talks--about the Kromski Sonata

Tim Talks–about the Kromski Sonata

3) INTERNET VIDEOS and ARTICLES–I watched lots of videos and read articles and books. The more I learned about spinning wheels, the more I understood. The biggest consideration seemed to be single-drive or double-drive. (I knew I wanted two treadles.) One lady who bought the double-drive Schacht Matchless (price is about $1100) said she bought it because she wanted options–the Matchless can be used as a single-drive as well. When she said she always uses it as a single-drive it seemed pointless to me to have paid all that money.

The Schacht Matchless

The Schacht Matchless


4) Does it come assembled?
5) Can you travel with it?
6) Is there support available?
7) Can you easily get parts?
If you want to make your own bobbins, can you buy the necessary inserts for the wheel you're considering? This was one of the deciding factors for me.

If you want to make your own bobbins, can you buy the necessary inserts for the wheel you’re considering? This was one of the deciding factors for me.

I felt weirdly pressured to buy the Schacht Matchless, but I didn’t want to. It was the first (and third) wheel I tried. I don’t understand the double-drive difference yet–I’m a beginner and I want to get started practicing. Besides, to be honest, I don’t like the name Schacht. When I first saw it I had no idea how to pronounce it, and kept saying it wrong. (It sounds exactly like “shacked.”) While Kromski Sonata is a lovely name, its price kicked it out of the running (although the carrying bag was definitely enticing).

I decided to go with the Lendrum Original. When I used it, I felt like a warm knife in cool butter. I felt relaxed and comfortable when I used it.

Can you sit aback and relax? Can you actually look away while spinning with your chosen wheel?

Can you sit back and relax? Can you actually look away while spinning with your chosen wheel?

The look of the tilted wheel put me off at first, but it didn’t affect performance and I decided to like its unconventionality. It’s easy to fold down and travel with, though one of the heavier, larger travel models. It comes assembled and finished, so I don’t have to think about doing it myself and forever being sorry I got one that needs finishing. It’s easy to find online help and parts for. And the name reminds me of a word from Watership Down (though, sadly, the lendri are enemies of the rabbits).

I ordered mine last night, at 11:00 P.M. MDT, from The Woolery because they offered me a $25 gift certificate and I was making other purchases from them that Paradise Fibers didn’t have. Today I received this email notice:

Wonder how long I can hold my breath . . .

Wonder how long I can hold my breath . . .

"dish cloth #5"

“dish cloth #5”


H (5 mm) crochet hook
Cotton yarn (I think one small ball makes 2-2.5 cloths)

Abbreviations and notes:
ch = chain
sc = single crochet

“Space” in rows 2-end refers to the space created by the 2 chains between the single crochets. Insert the hook all the way under the chains (don’t try to go through any of the threads of the chain), into the space between single crochets, hook the yarn and pull up to form your sc.

I find row 25 to be a bit bulky when trying to add the border, so I’ve included a couple of options (see below).

Add a single crochet border around the edge to give it a nice finish and to support the cloth when it’s wet so it doesn’t get all skiwompas.

Instructions:

Chain 35

Row 1: sc-ch 2-sc in 2nd ch from hook; *skip 2 ch, (sc-ch 2-sc) in next ch* across; ch 1, turn

Rows 2-24: (sc-ch 2-sc) in each ch 2 space across; ch 1, turn

Row 25 and finishing (original instructions): (2 sc in first ch 2 space-3 sc in next ch 2 space) across to last space, sc 2. sc around border with 3 sc in each corner, tie off, weave in ends.

OR Row 25 and finishing: do row 25 as above and sc on remaining three sides, with 3 sc in each corner; tie off, weave in ends.

OR Row 25 and finishing: skip row 25 and sc on four sides, with 3 sc in each corner. (I think this is the option I prefer.)

The number of rows doesn’t matter, if you have trouble counting crochet rows. Just go till it looks square. In the photo the Christmas colored cloth has a contrasting border, so you can change colors for that step and go with the original instructions or the last option.