for MW

So, here’s what I was thinking as I constructed a 49 pins-per-side loom today: “Why don’t all the loommakers send me samples of their looms so I can promote them and extend their product’s usability?” (This is how I think while poking 192 holes and then placing 192 pins in a cardboard loom.) And then I realized, “Why should they? I’m plugging their products even though I don’t own any of them.”

(Apparently I need to clarify the above paragraph. It was meant as something of a joke. It’s probably selfish of me to wish my grunt work on others. I didn’t mean to solicit offers!)

Today’s ad features a 12″ x 12″ loom (what I’d call a bias loom) with 49-per-side equidistant pins.

12″ x 12″ loom — photo by Theresa Jewell. Used with permission.

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If there’s one thing I’m good at, it’s making the required pieces for a project; attaching them to each other is another matter.

On the Facebook Pin Loom Weaving Support Group we’re working on two weave-alongs. One is a darling party dress for an 18″ doll—pattern courtesy of Hazel Spencer from Hazel Rose Looms. I’m working on the pieces for it.

The light pick yarn (second from upper left) was a bit too thin for my taste, so I'm combining it with the fuchsia crochet thread. These squares will be the body of the dress. The dark pink fluffy yarn (upper right) will be the skirt--very fancy indeed.

The light pink yarn (second from upper left) was a bit too thin for my taste, so I’m combining it with the fuchsia crochet thread. These squares will be the body of the dress. The dark pink fluffy yarn (upper right) will be the skirt—very fancy indeed.

Skip on over to Hazel’s blog for info on the lacy edge stitch she created for the skirt hem. I’m not sure if she wanted me to share the pattern on my blog or not, so to be safe, I won’t. You can join the Facebook group and find the instructions in the Files section.

Hazel Rose Party Dress.

Hazel Rose Party Dress.

Stay tuned for more updates on my Party Dress Progress.

View finished dress here: Doll Dress Weave-Along Finale.

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A double row of leno followed by several rows of plain weave, then a single row of leno.

A double row of leno followed by several rows of plain weave, then a single row of leno.

I thought it would be interesting to try cropping a photo in a diamond shape. When photographing my bias leno squares, the openings didn’t show if the squares were laid flat, so I held this one up to the light. I confess I don’t really know what leno means (other than that it’s the former Tonight Show host’s last name), but I understand it’s a type of lace.

Oh, why not? Let’s look it up. So, leno is a type of weave wherein warp threads are twisted to give an open look. Read More →