for MW

So, here’s what I was thinking as I constructed a 49 pins-per-side loom today: “Why don’t all the loommakers send me samples of their looms so I can promote them and extend their product’s usability?” (This is how I think while poking 192 holes and then placing 192 pins in a cardboard loom.) And then I realized, “Why should they? I’m plugging their products even though I don’t own any of them.”

(Apparently I need to clarify the above paragraph. It was meant as something of a joke. It’s probably selfish of me to wish my grunt work on others. I didn’t mean to solicit offers!)

Today’s ad features a 12″ x 12″ loom (what I’d call a bias loom) with 49-per-side equidistant pins.

12″ x 12″ loom — photo by Theresa Jewell. Used with permission.

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Ready for the next phase of the Book Weave-Along?

Start out with your loom warped up with two colors. (For this demonstration I used the simpler method of two-color weaving, i.e. NOT working in ends as I go.)

***REMEMBER: YOU CAN CLICK ON A PHOTO TO ENLARGE IT. CLICK THE BACK ARROW (UPPER LEFT CORNER OF SCREEN) TO RETURN TO THESE INSTRUCTIONS.

Two-color warping (simple method) all ready for weaving.

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Using two colors . . .

This demonstration will show L1-3 in main color (MC) and L4 in contrast color (CC). I’ll start with the simpler method.

METHOD ONE—Simple Color Change

First, decide which yarns to use for your main color and contrast color. I like to warp the loom with a thinner yarn and weave with a slightly thicker yarn. In the photo below, the pale purple and white are the thicker, CC yarns. I’ll warp two looms—one with lilac and the other with soft green—then weave with pale purple and white, respectively.

Thinner yarns are top and bottom; thicker yarns in the middle.

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A member of the Facebook Pin Loom Weaving Support Group residing in the UK asked today about how to use a loom with equidistant pins (hereinafter referred to as “bias looms”). The only instructions she could find were for three-pin configured looms such as Weave-It and Zoom Loom. Someone asked her to post a photo of her loom—which was a wise thing to do. We all assumed she had a Loomette-type of loom (which I’ve written about before), but hers was different. The Loomette (which is not a bias loom) has 21 pins per side and no corner pins, for a total of 23 spaces. Our UK member’s loom has corner pins with 20 per side—for a total of 19 spaces.

Loom with 20 pins per side, all equally spaced

It seemed to some of us that this loom was designed for bias-style weaving and I didn’t think it would work in the three-layer warping (3LW) style. Personally, I think bias weaving is harder and less fun to do than three-layer weaving, so I thought I’d give this loom a try and see if it could handle the “funner” style.

Quick loom with 20 pins per side

I started off trying to quickly and cheaply approximate a 4-inch square, 20 pins per side, loom (during which my 10-month-old Labrador puppy burst through our child-proof gate and escaped into the neighborhood; pursuit ensued). After experimenting, I decided to make the loom more sturdy. (I’ve also rewritten this post because I discovered a mistake I made in warping L2. The following is the updated version.)

The cardboard pin loom is now sturdier with a layer of fun foam.

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