I’m pleased to announce the almost-arrival of the new Wunderwag Industries Pin Looms.

Wunderwag Industries 3-loom set

I had a significant amount of input on these looms. Features include . . .

  • a frame slightly wider than the Weave-It (for easier handling), but not so wide that it will interfere with needle manueverability
  • rows and corners numbered in black, and center markings on the top and bottom edges
  • a clear acrylic frame that makes it easier to see what’s happening at Corner 3 when you get to that last, tight row of weaving
  • headless steel pins
  • full compatibility with Weave-It/Zoom Loom squares

Read More →

A member of the Facebook Pin Loom Weaving Support Group residing in the UK asked today about how to use a loom with equidistant pins (hereinafter referred to as “bias looms”). The only instructions she could find were for three-pin configured looms such as Weave-It and Zoom Loom. Someone asked her to post a photo of her loom—which was a wise thing to do. We all assumed she had a Loomette-type of loom (which I’ve written about before), but hers was different. The Loomette (which is not a bias loom) has 21 pins per side and no corner pins, for a total of 23 spaces. Our UK member’s loom has corner pins with 20 per side—for a total of 19 spaces.

Loom with 20 pins per side, all equally spaced

It seemed to some of us that this loom was designed for bias-style weaving and I didn’t think it would work in the three-layer warping (3LW) style. Personally, I think bias weaving is harder and less fun to do than three-layer weaving, so I thought I’d give this loom a try and see if it could handle the “funner” style.

Quick loom with 20 pins per side

I started off trying to quickly and cheaply approximate a 4-inch square, 20 pins per side, loom (during which my 10-month-old Labrador puppy burst through our child-proof gate and escaped into the neighborhood; pursuit ensued). After experimenting, I decided to make the loom more sturdy. (I’ve also rewritten this post because I discovered a mistake I made in warping L2. The following is the updated version.)

The cardboard pin loom is now sturdier with a layer of fun foam.

Read More →

I received a note today, written in Spanish, asking for clarification on a pattern I posted nearly two years ago: the “Diamonds Stitch” pattern weave*.

“Diamonds Stitch” square, still on loom

I don’t speak Spanish, so in order to understand and respond I had to employ Google Translator. I hope it worked. While I was figuring out what to say, I noticed the pattern was recorded in my old style of writing instructions, so I decided to update them. While I’m at it, I’ll also include more instructions on working in ends, along with instructions on improving the overall look of your squares—for those who care about such things. Read More →

OK, that pun doesn’t really work. Anyway, I succeeded the first time. Sort of.

Right triangle success

You may or may not remember a post I wrote last July* after I built my first triangle loom. I recorded some tips I wanted to remember the next time I wove a triangle.

Two days ago I wove my second triangle.

Lapse of several months, right? That’s because the first triangle I made was so DIFFICULT to weave that I couldn’t summon the desire to make another. Squares are useful and fun to weave, so why go through fire?

Enter 18″ doll Party Dress. Remember this weave-along? Read More →